Beauty lovers take note.

As if Savannah isn't pretty enough, its scenic riverside gets an art boost this weekend for the River Street Art Fest.

Rousakis Plaza becomes an outdoor gallery from 4-10 p.m. April 4 and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. April 5. Also, local bands and schools will dance, sing and play music on the Arbor Stage throughout the weekend.

"River Street is just one of those really beautiful backdrops. It's just going to be a really fun, visual event," said Leigh Anne DiVito, public relations manager for the Savannah Waterfront Association, which is hosting the event.

"We (Savannahians) like pretty things," said Carrie Bligh, executive director for the Savannah Waterfront Association.

About 40 regional artists and their work - paintings, woodwork, glasswork, drawings, photography, fiber, pottery, jewelry and more - will line the river under white tents.

Artists also entered one piece in the weekend's contest. Four judges screened each entry, making sure that it was handmade, according to DiVito.

Officials announce category winners at 1:30 p.m. April 5.

Festivalgoers can meet the artists and ask questions, finding out, for example, how they created their art and what inspired the pieces.

"It's just really neat seeing what they create ... You kind of see their vision," DiVito said.

Also under those white tents are students from Georgia Southern University, demonstrating how to make paper.

Other interactive art includes caricature drawings, face painting, a class for participants to complete a painting and a Marilyn Monroe impersonator for photo opportunities, courtesy of Telfair Museums.

Even the river will boast art of sorts.

Two tall ships, replicas of Christopher Columbus' the Niña and Pinta, will dock beside River Street during the festival. People can tour the ships for a fee.

"They're kind of works of art if you really look at them," Bligh said.

And expect entertainment.

A barbershop quartet and a women's ensemble from Savannah Arts Academy will perform at 6 p.m. April 4. Also, Savannah Arts dancers take the stage at 1 and 2 p.m. April 5, showing a mix of classical ballet, jazz and modern dance.

Then at 4 p.m. April 5, a group from Abeni Cultural Arts showcases a traditional African dance, possibly with live drumming.

Local bands are expected to play that evening, too, according to DiVito.

"I am excited," Bligh said. "We're bringing in a lot of the community groups."

Elementary schools provide yet another artistic piece of the festival. Classes from 14 local schools decorated 50-gallon barrels, competing for three prizes.

Locals can drop art supplies in the barrels for the schools.

The Savannah Waterfront Association posted the schools' art wish lists on their website, www.riverstreetsavannah.com.

Edible festival art includes Savannahian Adam Turoni's chocolate available for purchase.

"His chocolates are so unique, they're kind of art in themselves," DiVito said.

Savannahians may better recognize the weekend event as "Fine Arts on the River," which was also an April art contest held on River Street.

But officials with the Savannah Waterfront Association wanted to add monthly themes to their first Friday and Saturday celebrations.

Their April fine arts contest is now the River Street Art Fest with added performances.

And locals will even find art on the way to the festival with downtown monuments and fountains.

"Our city is almost a work of art when you look at it," Bligh said. "It's seems like we're surrounded by it."