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‘Animal Instinct’ offers variety at Telfair

  • Robert Moran (American, b. 1932), Class of ’76, 1976, Watercolor and pencil on wove paper, 22 ¼ x 29 ¾ in., Gift of the National Academy of Design, New York, Henry Ward Ranger Fund, 1979.
  • David Julian Leonard (American, b. 1962), "Bittersweet," 1995 Fuji color, Crystal Archive Sight: 13 x 19 1/4 inches, Museum purchase, 2003.
  • Jack Leigh (American, 1948-2004) Piggly Wiggly, 1/50, 2003 Gelatin silver print 14 x 18 inches Gift of the Jack Leigh Gallery, 2006.
  • Roni Horn (American, b. 1955), Untitled, 1997, C-print on Fuji color paper, 20 x 16 in., Edition of 25 + 10 APs, Gift of Zoë and Joel Dictrow, 2013.
 

‘Animal Instinct’ offers variety at Telfair

10 Jul 2017

Telfair has a new, smallish show going up in its second floor hallway at the Jepson Center titled “Animal Instinct,” which is drawn from the permanent collection and organized by assistant curator Erin Dunn.

The show connects in some ways with the William Wegman photography exhibition in the upstairs galleries, which is up through mid-August.

“We’ve been trying to put more permanent collection work in the hallway and we had the William Wegman exhibit up during this time, so really William Wegman was the jumping-off point,” explains Dunn. “We’re starting to think of it as the collection corridor. It’s kind of a chance to bring out works that haven’t been on view for a while… We try to make connections with larger exhibitions that are on view in our galleries, so it’s something that makes sense.”

“Animal Instinct” is comprised of a variety of works in different mediums from a number of mostly American artists who have explored animal imagery. From Roni Horn’s stark photo of a white owl against a white background, to Kate Javens’ rendering of a hulking bison, to other intriguing representations of fowl and fauna, the show reflects on “the myriad roles that various creatures play inour lives” as well as “the human desire to anthropomorphize creatures in order to better understand them.”

It’s interesting to note that the exhibition is being shown not in a gallery, but in the hallway that connects the Jepson’s cafe space with the auditorium and tech galleries. It’s an area that’s been activated in many ways before and in some respects it’s perfect for smaller shows like “Animal Instinct.” Jepson’s cafe space is going through some changes, but it remains dedicated to exhibiting local art in conjunction with Telfair’s #art912 initiative.

The relatively new Tech Space toward the rear of the building hasn’t received too much exposure so far, but that area will be a permanent home to a rotating roster of tech and digital art that’s also part of the Telfair’s permanent collection. It will also serve Telfair’s PULSE: Art + Technology festival each year. The current exhibit on view in the Tech Space “provides a window into some of the techniques and technologies explored in the last decade by contemporary artists and examines how lines have blurred between visual art and computer science.”

So, while the larger exhibitions get the lion’s share of attention, like the upcoming Rodin exhibit, the smaller shows the Telfair mounts fill some of the gaps in interesting ways and allow a wider exploration of themes not always on display in the larger galleries. There always seems like something new to explore at Telfair.

IF YOU GO

What: “Animal Instinct”

When: July 15-Nov. 26

Where: Jepson Center, 207 W. York St.

Cost: Varies

Info: telfair.org

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