Do Savannnah

Jane Coslick Holiday Cottage Tours showcase Tybee to help Humane Society

  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
  • Photo by Adriana Iris Boatwright
 

Jane Coslick Holiday Cottage Tours showcase Tybee to help Humane Society

30 Nov 2015

Tybee Island is kicking off the holiday season by opening the doors to seven of its cottages as well as the Tybee Post Theater on Dec. 5.

The Jane Coslick Holiday Cottage Tour is marking its fourth year of showcasing cottages decorated by the well-known interior designer. Besides offering tour-goers an inside look at the homes, the $30 ticket also supports the Humane Society for Greater Savannah and its goal to open a low-cost spay and neuter clinic in January.

Coslick and organizer Shirley Sessions offered a sneak preview of what is in store for this year’s event.

IF YOU GO

What: Jane Coslick Holiday Cottage Tour

When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 5

Where: Tybee Island

Cost: $30 to benefit Humane Society for Greater Savannah

Info: www.tybeefun.com

Also: Coslick will be available for questions after the tour at Seaside Sisters, 1207 U.S. 80.

“We just finished redesigning this one,” Coslick says of the Sundew Cottage. “The owner loves to cook, so this kitchen is the heartbeat of this cottage.”

Coslick’s designs are fresh, cool and modern — not cluttered or overly furnished — and oh so cozy. Her real strength lies in her use of colors, because she is not afraid to use them. Her attention to detail is nonpareil. From the light fixtures to linen closets, everyday items are placed with the clear purpose of being showcased while also being useful.

The tour will also take you to the historic Tybee Post Theater. Located in the heart of the Fort Screven Historic District, the theater was constructed in 1930 as a movie house for soldiers stationed at the Army base. The theater was closed in the mid-1960s, followed by many years of neglect, then several years of renovation.

The curtain was raised for the first time in 50 years this past September. Now it is a place for Tybee residents and visitors to take in the performing arts and movies, along with serving as a wedding venue.

“Although we are raising funds for the Humane Society, I want to let the public know that the theater is doing its own fundraising where you can purchase a brick or granite star and commemorate that special someone,” Sessions adds.

The stars that adorn the pathways give a Hollywood Walk of Fame feel to the space, which adds another charming touch to this tour.

At times, visitors may forget how much history lies within Tybee Island. Serving as a military facility during the Spanish War, World War I and World War II, all buildings were later declared a surplus and sold to the city of Savannah, which later auctioned them off to the public. Many residents have restored and preserved these structures, making the architecture and landscape of the island one that is eclectic and at times whimsical.

Coslick helps bring that history and whimsy to life, Sessions says. It may be impossible to leave this tour without daydreaming of what it would be like to live in one of these homes.

“Jane possesses so much creativity and sensibility,” she says. “Her cottages are like a mermaid’s dream home.”

 

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