My buddy George lives out on Tybee Island. Much like the rest of the world, on occasion he'll take a picture of his dinner and distribute it via social media.

Sometimes it's an unidentifiable piece of what-not on a plate with a half ear of corn. Other times it's a nice looking tray of oysters he's enjoying somewhere out while watching a ball game.

There are some pretty good eats on Tybee.

Tybee Island Social Club is probably my favorite, and Gerald's shrimp are some of the best in the region.

There's the top-shelf grub at the Breakfast Club and the late-night pies at Huc-A-Poo's.

But when was the last time you stopped in for a scoop of ice cream at The Sugar Shack?

I've popped in to The Sugar Shack a time or two, typically on Beach Bum parade weekends. The lines are out the door with everyone looking for a great scoop of ice cream. Not only will they find it, but they'll also find quite a unique story.

"We bought this place when I was 14 years old," says Russell Grosse, one of the owners of The Sugar Shack.

He, his brother and their mom, 82-year-old Mary Grosse, are the key people that keep the Shack so sweet.

"We used to sell peanuts out on the beach. We took that money and a small bank loan and bought this place out of bankruptcy court," Russell says.

Of course, at no point did anyone think they'd still be here all this time later working as part of the family business.

"We thought we'd buy it and eventually sell it and split it up." Russell tells me. "And here we are all this time later."

Ms. Grosse was too bashful to talk to me about what she's been doing the last 40 years or so, but the children tell me she's in to work every day at 5 a.m. getting everything ready for their breakfast service, which begins at 7 a.m.

When she is done with her work day in the afternoon or evening, she'll go home and walk six miles. Yeah, seriously.

The brothers keep everything flowing smoothly. Russell comes in, his brother is behind the counter, nephew takes over in the afternoon. Everyone doing their part to make The Sugar Shack what it has been since the early 1970s.

"I think that is what holds the most appeal with people, the family atmosphere," Russell says.

Of course, no great restaurant story is complete without good food, right? There are no tales of every scoop being handmade in the back or old family recipes like you will find at Leopold's. The Sugar Shack's premium ice cream comes from New Jersey.

"We are the only place south of Macon who carries it," Russell says. "It's a rich, quality product that everyone here loves."

This is very true. The ice cream is very good. No frills, served in a Styrofoam cup with a plastic spoon. Very casual, very laid back, very, very Tybee.

"You're not going to please everyone," he says. "But we've been here for 41 years, so we've made enough people happy."

The lines can get long, especially on weekend evenings, but everyone is looking for ice cream. The grill closes at 7 p.m.

The locals know all about it. Regular visitors to the island, I'm certain, do as well. If you don't, you most definitely should.

Plenty of outdoor seating to enjoy the ocean breeze and a scoop.

I'm sure George has.

See you on TV.

QUICK BYTES

⢠Speaking of Tybee Island, I visited with the great staff at Sundae Café this week. They are very quietly one of the best restaurants in town. So much so that they asked me to mention they are now "suggesting" reservations on Saturday nights. They aren't required, but chances are you won't get a table unless you are willing to wait a while. Last week, their earliest seating was 9 p.m. Call ahead if you are going to visit.

⢠I'm being told Spudnik, a baked potato spot on West Broughton Street, is very good. Breakfast potatoes, Mexican potatoes and all kinds of toppings for a baked potato. I am intrigued enough to move it up on my short list of 'get there soon.'

⢠Quick reminder: Our season premiere of "Eat It and Like It" is 7:30 a.m. Sept. 29 on WSAV. Wake up with us or set your DVR. Either way, Savannah's best local television show is back!

⢠Here's your weekly reminder to take a look at the lineup coming to town for the Savannah Food and Wine Festival from Nov. 11-17. Every time I'm asked about it and I start mentioning names and events, the people I'm talking to say, "Oh really, I had no idea." This is going to be a world-class event year one. Trust me. Go to savannahfoodandwinefest.com.

BY JESSE BLANCO