Do Savannnah

Tybee Post Theater presents ‘Ladies of the Blues’

  • Huxsie Scott
  • Danielle Hicks
 

Tybee Post Theater presents ‘Ladies of the Blues’

09 Feb 2016

IF YOU GO

What: “Ladies of the Blues” with Danielle Hicks and Huxsie Scott

When: 8 p.m. Feb. 13

Where: Tybee Post Theater, 10 Van Horne Ave., Tybee Island

Cost: $25 or $22.50 for theater members

Info: www.tybeeposttheater.org

It’s been more than four decades since Huxsie Scott first took the stage belting out blues to an adoring crowd, and for her, it’s still a dream job.

“It’s something I want to do every day,” she said. “That hasn’t changed.”

The Savannah legend said her musical influences have always leaned to the blues, colored in a bit of gospel.

“They both tell a story and that’s my job — to tell that story and give the message of the song.”

Scott will tell the stories of love on Feb. 13 at Tybee Post Theater during a Valentine’s Day-themed concert coined “Ladies of the Blues.” This is the first of a three-part blues concert series and will feature Scott and another local songstress, Danielle Hicks.

The pair, both originally from Georgia, represents two generations of the blues: Scott as one of the leading names in female blues in the South, and Hicks with a newer adaptation of the genre.

“I started out singing rock ‘n’ roll with my dad’s band, then pop and R&B in New York,” Hicks said. “I’ve only focused on the blues for the past five years, but I’ve always been drawn to it. The blues represents something so classic.”

The musical showcase will honor the classic as well with its talent and simplicity.

Set in cabaret style, the vocalists take center stage accompanied by pianist Jared Hall. This arrangement, void of theatrics, allows the audience to focus solely on the music, and with Hicks’ sultry vocals complementing Scott’s signature soul, is sure to be a diverse performance.

Ricardo Ochoa, music programing director for Tybee Post Theater, said the intimate setting, with less than 200 seats available, would add to the experience.

“The audience can enjoy the performance up close,” he said. “(This is) a place where the community can get to know the artists and feel proud of the them.”

The blues, like the other great American music forms — jazz, country, zydeco — was born in the South and then exported to places like St. Louis and Chicago, where it expanded and developed its own sound. But the theme is always the same, Hicks said.

“I feel like blues is about love or heartache. One or the other,” she said. “And that makes it personal.”

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