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Savannah Stopover: Floco Torres tells audiences ‘be ready to rage’

 

Savannah Stopover: Floco Torres tells audiences ‘be ready to rage’

07 Mar 2017

Hip hop artist Floco Torres (pronounced flock-o) is no stranger to Savannah. The Macon-based musician has performed in many of the city’s staple music venues, such as Congress Street Social Club and more.

“Just be ready to rage and dance and have fun,” Torres remarks when commenting on what to expect from a performance. He stressed that not a lot of people have been to a live hip hop show. When comparing it to a live rock show, he said, “Yes, it’s all live music but it’s just a different level of energy.”

Originally from Willingboro, N.J., he found his way to Macon in 2008 after a marketing internship fell through with a major record label in Atlanta. During that year, Torres debuted his first single, “Hot Like the Sun,” and landed a slot performing at Macon’s Bragg Jam Music Festival.

Torres first gained notoriety from his 2011 single “Cherry Street,” written for the Gateway Macon Music Competition. The song won numerous honors, including a national Telly award in 2012. Drawing most of his inspiration from life, the performer has amassed an impressive catalogue that includes 21 projects to date; music that is sure to connect with a diverse audience of listeners.

Torres’ latest project, “The Porsche Ep,” is a play on his childhood dream of one day owning a Porsche himself. In the title track “87 911,” Torres explains to his listeners what he truly means through his lyrics by taking them on a journey from where he first saw his dream car to actually owning one himself (figuratively) and telling a young boy, “Don’t let nobody tell you ‘bout what you can’t be.”

Prior to “The Porsche EP,” Torres dropped an EP titled “(V)insanity,” which honors the nickname of his favorite basketball player, Vince Carter.

“You have a level of quality that should be recognized on a higher platform and it isn’t,” Torres said. Since then, Torres has been touring often and plays between 50-70 shows a year independently.

Asked if he labeled himself “hip hop” consciously, Torres simply remarked, “it fits,” and after listening to his music, anyone with a brief understanding of the culture itself would agree. Torres bridges off from today’s radio-friendly melodies and focuses his attention more on content. Although it may not be as lucrative, the artist continues to provide his listeners with quality music that’s reminiscent of classic hip hop with his mixture of thought-provoking lyricism layered on top of soulful samples.

Floco Torres is slated to drop two new projects this year, one being another short EP followed by his long-awaited album. The artist has not released a full-length album in more than five years. With ample amount of time to put together something special, Torres surely won’t disappoint.

Floco Torres

10:30 p.m. March 10

Club One, 1 Jefferson St.

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