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Savannah’s Light the Night supports patients with blood cancers

  • Every person who registers for Light the Night on Oct. 13 in Daffin Park will receive a lantern in one of three colors. The lighting ceremony starts at dusk, about 7 p.m., and includes the lighting of lanterns one color at a time, with the honorary lantern holder telling their story. (Courtesy LLS Savannah)
  • Savannah Light the Night will unveil its new Remembrance Pavilion at Daffin Park on Oct. 13. (Courtesy LLS Savannah)
  • Savannah Light the Night will host a grand finale fireworks show at Daffin Park on Oct. 13. (Courtesy LLS Savannah)
 

Savannah’s Light the Night supports patients with blood cancers

10 Oct 2017

Recent hurricanes and major storms around the country have put some people with blood cancers in jeopardy, financially struggling to replace their lost medicines or even to find transportation to get to doctor appointments or treatment centers in devastated areas.

Now these patients are eligible to receive a one-time grant of $500 from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, up to at least $1 million. Money is raised around the country, including locally with the 19th annual Light the Night event Oct. 13 at Daffin Park.

The premise of Light the Night is to bring light to the darkness of cancer, spreading hope, happiness and joy, said campaign manager Lauren Mathews. Carnival games operated by local sports teams and other groups, live music and food trucks will bring a festive atmosphere and a new feel to the event that started as a walk only.

Festivities will include live music by Lyn Avenue, food trucks, a Kids Zone featuring a bouncy house, a Team Tailgate Zone by Savannah Sport and Social and a Remembrance Pavilion, where guests can honor loved ones or leave notes of encouragement for the patients and families battling blood cancer.

Attendance and registration is free, but donations are requested to help LLS meet its $250,000 local goal.

The society is a patient-centric organization, Mathews said, adding that financial relief will go to patients in Georgia, Florida, Texas, Louisiana and South Carolina.

The society also funds research to find a cure for the blood cancers: leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Mathews said. It is estimated there will be about 4,680 new diagnoses for blood cancer in Georgia in 2017.

Every person who registers for Light the Night will receive a lantern in one of three colors, Mathews said. A patient or survivor holds a white lantern. A family walking in memory of someone lost to blood cancer receives a gold lantern. And a supporter of the society holds a red lantern.

The lighting ceremony starts at dusk, about 7 p.m., and includes the lighting of lanterns one color at a time, with the honorary lantern holder telling their story, Mathews said.

“If there are 500 lanterns in Daffin Park that night, it’s a cool night,” Mathews said. “If there are 1,500, the experience is so much different.”

IF YOU GO

What: 19th annual Light the Night

When: 5:30-10 p.m. Oct. 13

Where: Daffin Park

Why: The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in Savannah raises money to help patients with blood cancers, including treatments and research to find a cure.

Info: lightthenight.org/ga or text 51555

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