Patrons, be prepared to sign a waiver for this show. The stars have aligned and the space portal is opening.

The Wormhole is hosting surf rock and science fiction-themed Man or Astro-man? on April 25, and scientists predict a black hole will open, taking all of the Starland District with it.

Frontman and founding member Star Crunch, better known as Brian Causey, isn't so sure that will not happen.

"It might be the last show," Causey said. "We might get sucked in and are never able to come out.

"Maybe between The Wormhole's technology on hand, and the technology we have, maybe people should have to sign waivers at the door that say, 'This might be last time you're a part of this known universe, and you might get sucked into the space-time continuum.'"

More than likely, that won't happen. What most assuredly will happen is a barrage of good surf punk, mostly instrumental, rock with all the wild sound effects and retro science fiction gadgets you can stand.

Formed in the early 1990s, the Auburn, Ala., band reeked havoc on the musical world with eight studio albums, as well as a score of singles and compilations, over an eight-year period.

After touring constantly, the band went on an extended hiatus in 2001.

Although the technology has changed and the stuff of science fiction in the 1990s is now reality, Man or Astro-man? was reborn knee-deep into the digital age.

In 2010, they reunited the live show with the original members. Instead of using Apple printers for sound effects, the band has upgraded to the new age. Bass player Coco the Electronic Monkey Wizard, sometimes known as Robert DelBeuno, now has his sampler wirelessly programmed into his bass.

"We always thought of Man Astro-Man as retro-futuristic," Causey said. "In that we were the band that was like the 2014 of what the Jetsons' future was.

In what the people in 1961 envisioned 2014 to be like. In a sense, everything we do is supposed to be futuristic and archaic at the same time!"

"At the end of the day, Man Astro-Man is just about being a band," Causey continued. "It's drums, bass, two guitars and amps. A lot of the technology and imagery is like a nice facade on a house - it's entertaining and a way to keep having fun, and to have an entertaining show.

"As mundane or pedestrian as it sounds, we're just trying to be a tight rock 'n' roll band."

Last year, the band dropped their ninth studio album, "Defcon 5...4...3...2...1," unleashing the old grooves of surf rock with a hint of punk and new wave in the mix. For Causey and company, it was like old times.

"I think it came out like a record that would have come out for us where we left off," Causey said. "So it's not necessarily a progression, it's kind of where we left off, and where we wanted to continue going. Which I think is natural, and also organic, in the sense that it still sounds like the same band.

"But it doesn't sound like we're doing a victory lap of what we do," he said with a laugh.

Local band Crazy Bag Lady will open, as well as Wray. Tickets can be purchased at www.wormholebar.com.

If you make it back, let us know how the black hole, space-time thing works. Neil deGrasse Tyson is itching to know. As for Savannah, Causey is all too familiar.

"Because of the college and the townies, there's always a good collection of weirdos there," he said of Savannah.

"I mean that in a very positive way. There was always interesting people making art. It seemed people in Savannah weren't really trying to commercialize.

"People were just doing weird stuff for the sake of it, and because it was cool. I think we always meshed well there."