She may only be 17, but Anna Grace Beatty seems to know exactly where she is going in life.

The Birmingham native hit the road with just her songs and a guitar after she graduated high school back in December and she’s being going full throttle ever since.

Beatty will make her Savannah debut on June 28 at 7 p.m. at the Sentient Bean. She’ll be sharing the show with a familiar face, Savannah’s Matt Eckstine, former frontman of the local favorite Americana band, The Accomplices. The evening will feature a combination of folk, rock ‘n’ roll, soul and blues.

Beatty released her first EP, “Burns You Up,” in October 2018, and it features two solo-penned songs along with three songs she co-wrote. Several of her songs, like “Miss Me” and “Ain’t No Man,” have received airplay on her hometown stations.

 

“My first EP has that Americana sound with Southern influences,” she said. “Matt and I have a very similar sound. But my new EP is very much more pop.”

On July 1, she will launch a Patreon page at annagracebeatty.com where fans can subscribe and get early access to her new content and music videos.

While it’s typical to hear stories about young artists knowing they wanted to be musicians as toddlers, Beatty’s story is a little different. She said she started writing songs about three or four years ago.

“I started piano lessons around age 9 or 10 and did that for a few years and got bored and went off and did sports,” she recalled. “None of that was really my thing until I eventually started playing guitar and very quickly it caught on. And writing was a great outlet for me to express what I was feeling. Those years are very weird and rough, anyway, so writing helped me a lot.

“And then it all happened kind of quick. I played in church a lot and then did some open mics. We used to have this wonderful listening room in Birmingham, and I played an open mic there — those were my first performances. I even opened a show there a few years ago. It was my first actual show where my name was on the bill.”

 

Even though she’s still relatively new at music business, Beatty said she’s received a lot of feedback on her music.

“The feedback has been really good,” she said. “It’s a big relief, especially with the first project, but thankfully in Birmingham and all over the southeast, people have been receptive. They pay more attention than you would think, especially to certain songs and especially to my work as a songwriter. I love hearing people’s thoughts on my music; it’s kind of a surreal.”

Tickets are a suggested donation of $5.