Savannah’s essential Quarantine Concerts series is continuing its support of the local music scene with a concert by rockabilly rockers Brady and the Bazookas.

Frontman and guitarist Brady Adams is a twenty year Air Force veteran who “wants to play the most American music possible.” Inspired by acts like The Stray Cats, Carl Perkins, and the Reverend Horton Heat, Adams is drawn to rockabilly because he believes it is the culmination of American music styles, combining blues, jazz, swing, country, rock and roll, and “whatever else works.”

But who are the Bazookas? Adams came up with the idea for his backing band from his experience playing in a band during his days in the San Antonio, Texas music scene.

“One of the biggest problems we had was that the lead singer, who I will affectionately call Beyoncé, would freak out if a band member couldn’t make a gig,” explains Adams. “I looked back at it and Chuck Berry used to tour the country by himself and get different musicians to play with him, so the Bazookas are by spirit only. I keep probably six or eight bass players on retainer, and drummers the same way. I just call guys up and when I tour Ohio or Texas, or anywhere that is outside the local region, I have a network of musicians I can call up and say, ‘Hey, can you support this gig?’.”

For his Quarantine Concert, The Bazookas will be bassist Brandon Coleman and drummer Tyler Faircloth.

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Adams has released several singles and EPs over the years, including “Don’t Stop Now,” “The White One,” and “Rocket Girl.” Adams has twelve songs ready to record an album, but when he felt like his music was in a rut, he took a friend’s advice and tried to write out of his comfort zone, leading to enough new songs for a future EP (at least when it’s possible to get back into a studio).

“I wrote a pop-country tune, and an 80s metal tune, some funk songs and the flood gates opened back up and that EP started to flow out much better,” said Adams.

Being a regular on the Savannah bar and club scene, Adams also keeps a lot of covers in his pocket.

“If I’m playing a three-or-four hour gig downtown Savannah it’s a big mix of originals and covers,” said Adams. “We do a lot of Elvis tunes, Eddie Cochran, some Stray Cat tunes. Savannah is a tourist town and that’s what they want — some familiarity. But if we’re playing at the Jinx of other clubs typically I’m going to play heavily original music because that’s what those venues are looking for.”

For the Quarantine Concert, Adams plans on playing strictly originals with the exception of a rockabilly style rendition of Pantera’s “Cowboys from Hell.”

Before the pandemic hit, Brady and the Bazookas were preparing to play a Stray Cats tribute show at Tybee Post Theater. Adams still hopes to make it happen when the quarantine eases up, with the help of some heavy-hitter musician friends from the Austin, Texas scene.

“Somebody who has a standup bass and is not afraid to throw it into the air, or a drummer who will stand up on top of his drums very similar to Slim Jim (Phantom) while he was doing it—really sell the act,” says Adams.

In the meantime, Adams has been playing a regular solo set on Facebook live every Thursday. He is also taking advantage of the downtime for some home improvement.

“Actually I feel really bad for the rest of the world because this world fiasco couldn’t have happened at a better time for me,” said Adams with a laugh. “My plumbing backed up, I didn’t have any work things and the kids are home from school and can sleep while we’re redoing bedrooms and changing carpet.”

Fortunately, Brady and the Bazookas will be able to get back on stage this Friday to do what they do best.

“We’ll go on and play fast-paced Rockabilly style vintage rock n’ roll, tell really dumb dad jokes in between, and try to put on a really good show,” said Adams.